Match-fixing investigation begins in Sierra Leone after promotion rivals win 95-0 and 91-1 at the same time

The Sierra Leone Football Association (SLFA) has launched an investigation into two first division matches that finished with scorelines of 91-1 and 95-0, describing them as impractical results.

The West African country’s governing body of the sport said it was investigating officials and players who were involved in the two fixtures, in which Gulf FC defeated Koquima Lebanon 91-1 and Lumbenbu United were beaten 95-0 by Kahula Rangers.

The SLFA said it had zero tolerance for match manipulation or anything of the sort.

“The general public is therefore assured that the said matter will be thoroughly investigated and anyone found culpable will face the full force of the law,” it said in a statement.

BBC report that the scorelines have been annulled after the half-time scores read just 7-1 and 2-0 respectively, with both the victorious teams having been level on points heading into the fixtures and were battling for the final place in a qualifying round for promotion.

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“We can’t stand by and see an embarrassing situation like this go unpunished,” SLFA president Thomas Daddy Brima said to BBC Sport Africa.

“We’re going to launch an immediate investigation and bring to book all those responsible for this mediocrity.

“All those found guilty will be dealt with in accordance with the SLFA laws, and will also be handed over to the country’s anti-corruption commission.”

It is further reported that the chairman of Koquima Lebanon suggested the result against Gulf FC was from a friendly game, while also disputing the 91-1 scoreline.

The referee from that fixture refused to officiate the second half and was seemingly replaced.

If confirmed, the two scorelines would rank among the highest recorded in football history.

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The highest is thought to have occurred in Madagascar in 2002 when AS Adema beat SO l’Emyrne 149-0. The SO l’Emyrne players intentionally scored one own goal after another in protest over refereeing decisions with which they disagreed.

Additional reporting by Reuters

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